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for being with us on this friday. let's tell you what we're doing next. we will take you to the bipartisan policy center here in washington, d.c. and the panel session that looks at what we have learned nine years after the 9/11 attacks. there is an evolving terrorist threat and there will be several speakers. live coverage begins shortly. thank you for being with us on this friday morning and we will see to morning -- tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. on "washington journal." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] . [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] >> we are leave at this national press club this morning where former 9/11 commission lee hamilton and tom cane will speak with reporters about how terrorist threats have changed since 9/11. the two are now co-chairs of the national security preparedness group of the bipartisan policy center. it's an organization founded three years ago by former senate majority leader tom daschle. bob dole, georg
he will embrace the notion and he his republic c >> the u.s. senate returned from their summer break. the nomination is scheduled at 5:30 p.m. eastern. the chamber returns to work and small-business lending bill that has been stalled since midsummer. follow the senate live on c-span 2. and the house returns from its summer recess tuesday at 2:00 p.m. eastern for legislative business. they will take up a handful of bills under suspension of the rules. those are scheduled for 6:00 p.m. eastern. tomorrow, members will take a resolution honoring the ninth anniversary of 9/11. on wednesday, they will work on a couple of measures designed to boost domestic manufacturing and a bill dealing with energy efficiency programs for rural areas. watch live house covered starting tuesday at 2:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> with the house and senate back in session, followed congress using the cspan video library congressional chronicle. beginning cadets a complete -- you can index a complete list of congressional members. it is free any time. watch you what you want, when you want. >> the people who
that were donated to us. these were original patents that were provided. some of them date back to the early 1800's. is a reminder of what makes this country so great, our inventiveness. are originally there were a bunch of plates up there and i decided i have the whole plate room so i don't need another one year. >> do you have but george washington year? >> i kept george washington, i have a brown blanket. this was donated by steven spielberg to the -- i have abraham lincoln. this was donated by steven spielberg to a bill clinton. it is by norman rockwell. you have these guys cleaning the torch. it is a reminder that we constantly have to renew the flames of our democracy. >> when people come in this room, how do you notice them react? >> well, you know, somebody said this is the greatest home court advantage you have in this office. i think people feel a certain reverence for this space, because it symbolizes the presidency and it symbolizes what has been extraordinary record of tough tough decision -- of tough decisions and monumental decisions made in this room. usually people have a bi
. >> there was a column this week called, "a superpower super broke," talking about the u.s. it is estimated that there are about two hundred al-qaeda agents. >> how many? >> 200-300. >> i thought you said two hundred million-300 million. >> know, we are spending about $1 million apiece. this is the tip of the iceberg. this is a conceptual question. is there any thinking about approaches that are not so expensive that may be more affordable? >> let me turn your question a little bit on its head to say that this is actually the more affordable way of going in comparison to many of our other assistance programs, this is still not that large. compared to what we have to deal with in a country that is broken in the case of an iraq or en afghanistan, this is a very small amount. i would underscore, as the president and secretary have, that this is a matter for the international community. there are a lot of countries to have recognized this challenge and shown their commitment with their pocketbooks. it is a difficult time, obviously for us. you could argue that our british friends are on a very
. when i spoke with members of congress this morning, all of us are convinced of one thing. we have to display absolute determination, a total will that will not tell -- will not fail, and we should show absolutely no weakness in our resolution. the iranians had months and months to change their behavior. there was an extended hand by president obama. they did not grab that extended hand. these economic sanctions way as much as possible so as to bring iran to be more responsible. france's condensed -- france is convinced that nobody should display any kind of weakness. >> thank you. >> former republican vice- presidential nominee sarah palin will be in iowa tomorrow night for the annual ronald reagan dinner in the morning. we will have live coverage beginning at 8:00 p.m. eastern here on c-span. the former alaska governor will be joined by iowa senator chuck grassley and former iowa governor terry branstad. book tv saturday night, bill clinton joins former british prime minister tony blair for a discussion of their years in office. that is on c-span-2. >> now a house hearing on a ch
europeans, they were well educated, emigrating to the u.s.. last year there were only three within the group by participated in. my colleague graduated in u.s., spending $200,000 of her own money on education. she went back to europe, and in these other countries that have no immigration -- no education and the immigration is a policy provided to the u.s.. guest: our population is multifaceted. our program shows that every time a child is given the chance, they can learn. in arkansas there was not much of a european population. all of those kids were achieving. the poverty level was 85%. we are proving again that kids can achieve, given the proper courses and teacher training. host: tom luce, thank you for talking to our viewers. guest: thank you. host: go to our website, c- span.org, to find out the events we are covering today in washington. the president will give his back to school speech at 1:00 p.m. eastern time. a stakeout after meeting with caucus members with mitch mcconnell after the meeting on the small business bill. live coverage on c-span 2. thank you for watching.
deserved for being a phenomenal leader and the u.s. congress for three decades, who's sitting right here in the front row. and i've just got to say how much all of it congressman phil crane has done for the cause. [applause] [alause] i've got to say one of the really early thrilled by head when i was enacted in politics as a young guy with cp had a guest there wasa young republican national convention in new orleans where i'm from and standing on a riverboat going down the river and congressman crane was there and was so approachable and he will remember it come up and i remember it to this day comes thathey're talking to me for the longest time, drinking a beer as if he had nothing better to do than talk to this college kid. and again, thank you, congressman crane. [applause] also one other shout out. my fellow yaf word member at georgetown university in the mid-80's and fellow fresan dorm for who we were in the same freshman dorm for, fellow iter, he is fed by a heck of a lot more people across this country than i did and is done great things to the conservative cause. my friend tried
permits. i'd now like to introduce our head table guests from your right. jeff, u.s. senate press gallery. jean from yahoo! news. lisa, "tribune newspaper's" "l.a. times." al, "the hill." andrew snyder, chairman of the speaker's committee, associate editor, kip linger washington editors. deborah, senior vice president, haguer sharp, and speaker's committee member who organized today's event. shawn, member of the press club board of governors. jonathan, bloomberg and former n.p.c. president. and a member from bergen records. [applause] today we are a little over a month away from elections that will likely bring changes in washington. poll after poll shows that voters are not happy. there's plenty of evidence that shows incurveents are unhappy. the economy is still struggling. the senate seems unable to move forward with major legislation as gridlock sets in final days before elections. it's not pretty. it's probably not a great time to be in charge of winning elections all over the country. or is it? our speakers today are two of the men who are in charge of leading their party's efforts
at the time of economic and fiscal arrested, and second is this the best use of limited dollars given the pressing needs to take cover ou care of our people. i share the secretary's objectives are reducing duplication overhead and access in the defense enterprise and instilling a culture of savings and restraint across the department of defense. on august 9, the sector followed up by announcing a series of specific cost-cutting measures, including a reduction in funding and for service support contracts by 10% per year for three years, a freeze on the number of o.s.d. defense agencies, a freeze on the general officers, a review and reduction of the number of reports, studies, and advisory boards, new limits on positions and contractors for intelligence functions. i agree with the secretary on the rapidly-expanding service contractors who supports the department. too often in the past we have constrained and number of department of defense employees without raisplacing a limit on service contractors. and rather than saving money, we have lost badly needed talent, expertise, and institu
pensions were rewards of for a long work, and we used to regulate labor markets for companies. the retirement age, the existence of retirement age in our society is a function of decisions, both of increased productivity in the last century and decisions we made about allocating leisure. much of the leisure we chose to take from increased productivity went into shorter workweeks, went into longer vacations, earlier than in the last century, before say the 1950's. after the 1940's or so, much of the increased leisure went into what we call retirement, a time of non-work. we created this institution. it is malleable to some extent. it is also terribly important. the yearly retirement story is interesting. it begins to some extent with the unions very successfully negotiating 30-year and out early retirement options, and many of the unions that have defined benefits in many of the businesses agreed to early retirement provisions that served the purpose of on the one hand, rewarding workers for long-term service, and two, turning over the labor force. i say that because the flip s
comfortable i think that will go a long way to helping us get out of what we are in. host: the twitter community on our website page which is c-span wj are talking about your background and the fact that you were a chief risk officer for several of these companies that were in trouble. guest: i was also a regulator. host: they are wondering -- and i am, too, you implied you didn't stay at some of them because of the risk the companies were taking. can you sort of speak in general about what kind of conversations you or some others that you know, your colleagues, might have had with executives and what kind of push-back you got? guest: that is a delicate situation for me because there is litigation going on so i can't speak to too many specifics. but i will come back and say i wrote a study on this back in the spring on risk management practices during the motor crisis and i believe the following from what i observed and it didn't matter what kind of institution it was, bank, thrift or whatever it was. or even the people there. these institutions, before the crisis, were very sales orie
carbon emissions, let me tell you what will not work. it would not work to use cat and trade. cap and trade is being put out as the way to solve this problem. cap and trade is the notion that we will set a limit on how much carbon emissions there will be. we will deal out the cards to people who get to the met this much carbon, and then we will say what -- now somebody else wants to reduce carbon, you have to buy one of these emissions permits. at the same meeting where i met t.j. rodgers, i also met jeff in help from general electric. just in health -- jeff, after giving an impassioned speech about how greene general electric -- she might have thought they were green electric rather than general electorate -- how greene generally lesser was and how -- how greene general electric was and how deserving they were to get this, more efficient engines, and so on and so forth. he capped it quite well when i asked him a question, were they really that green or with a just lobbying? he got a little bit mad, and he said, if you are not at the table, you're on the menu. let that soak in for
have used -- pack as far as cannabis goes, the vast majority of us have used it. as far as afghanistan and opium, we saw on the news where our soldiers were guarding the poppy fields. we're using our tax dollars to guard the poppy fields. this is a joke. as far as the opium and cocaine, and do not know, that marijuana is not that bad. it should be legalized. i do not use it no more. it is not that big a deal. thank you. guest: 2 richard and all of the other callers, one of the great advantages of living in the american society is we can have this dialogue and you get to this dialogue and you get to speak your piece, but clearly i cannot change the laws and the united states. elected officials get paid to do that. as long as illegal and unlawful, something i believe is correct and we should not be making illegal, then we are duty bound to enforce the laws. respectfully, i would tell you to direct your comments to congress. host: what keeps you awake at night, what worries you the most with respect to the importation of illegal drugs? guest: it is the drug trade and transnational crimina
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13